Every year, the world of watches gets turned onto its head whenever its most complicated watches come out. This year is no different as watch companies spared no expense introducing complicated watches. Of course, all this cultivated towards the annual GPHG 2018, which celebrates the very best of the world of watchmaking.

But what defines a complicated watch? Very simply put, a complication refers to a feature within a mechanical watch. This ranges from tourbillons to chronographs, moon phases, or even a perpetual calendar; these are the sort of features that get both avid collectors and aficionados excited. Of course, the more complications within a watch, the higher its price tag. When it comes to watches that carry several complications, they are often referred to as grandes complications.

Grandes complications are the highest echelon of watches that collectors yearn for. Due to its limited release, it creates a level of demand that only those with the means can afford. While many of these grande complications provide a certain purpose to the wearer, it’s mostly seen as a status symbol in one’s collection.

Scroll down below to check out some of the most complicated watches of 2018.

A. Lange & Söhne Triple Split

German watchmaker A. Lange & Söhne requires no introduction, building on its legacy with the A. Lange & Söhne Double Split that was very well received. The German watchmaker introduces the Triple Split in 2018, bringing even more complications to an instant classic. The A. Lange & Söhne Triple Split now comes with something that has never been done before, capable of measuring additive and comparative times for up to 12 hours. It’s also capable of keeping track of consecutive events like outbound and returning international flights. There were only 100 of the A. Lange & Söhne Triple Split made in white gold, which made its debut at SIHH 2018.

Vacheron Constantin Traditionelle Tourbillon

Another watch that made its debut during SIHH 2018 was the Vacheron Constantin Traditionelle Tourbillon, the first-ever automatic tourbillon to come out from the Swiss manufacturer. Powered by the new in-house calibre 2160 movement, the slow-beat automatic tourbillon sits at the 6 o’clock of the watch with an open carriage shaped like a Maltese cross. There are two variations of the Vacheron Constantin Traditionelle Tourbillon – either in pink gold or in platinum. The latter is the more limited edition timepiece at only 25 pieces, making it a must-have for fans and collectors alike.

Girard-Perregaux Minute Repeater Tri-Axial Tourbillon

Girard-Perregaux dates all the way back to 1791 — a powerful presence in the watchmaking industry. The Girard-Perregaux Minute Repeater Tri-Axial Tourbillon does just that, revolutionising the aesthetics and technology that go into a grande complication. Being up for contention in the mechanical exception at GPHG 2018, the Minute Repeater Tri-Axial Tourbillon showcases a contemporary design for horological complications with its minute repeater and tourbillon rotating simultaneously around three axes. If that wasn’t enough, all of its complications are housed within a titanium case.

Bvlgari Octo Finissimo Tourbillon Automatic

Bulgari goes one step higher than usual with the Octo Finissimo Tourbillon Automatic, breaking the mould that most grande complication are thick and chunk timepieces. At only 3.95mm thick, it broke three world records during its launch as the world’s thinnest automatic watch, the world’s thinnest automatic tourbillon, and the world’s thinnest tourbillon. The watch is powered by the new BVL 288 calibre, a self-winding flying tourbillon movement at only 1.95mm thick. This just goes to show how seriously Bulgari takes its watches, limiting it to only 50 pieces.

Krayon Everywhere Horizon

Krayon improves on its first Everywhere watch back in 2017, taking things up a notch with a custom variation known as the Everywhere Horizon.  Aside from being encrusted with diamonds around the bezel, the Everywhere Horizon comes with a unique complication that is unheard of; it’s capable of calculating the sunrise and sunset timings to your specific location, regardless of where you are. By simply inputting the latitude, longitude, date/month, and local UTC time zone, the precise movements of the sun will be shown at the outer dial.

Wi-Liam Teh
Senior Writer
Wi-Liam is a geek at heart with a penchant for tattoos. Never without a drink in hand (preferably whisky, gin, or Guinness), he is also a writer by day and a keyboard warrior by night. On his day off, he masquerades as a streetwear and sneakerhead enthusiast while his bank account says otherwise.