For years, the only way to get your hands on one of French firm Diptyque’s gorgeously scented candles, perfumes and range of face and bodycare would be online, or through smaller retailers and stores like Escentials and Tangs.

But the brand’s acolytes looking for a true experience can now revel in a new 423-square-foot space. After all, it’s only befitting to inhale Diptyque’s allure in an environment that melds seamlessly with the elegant sensuality of its products — short of making a trip to the original store at Boulevard St Germain in Paris.

The interiors of Diptyque’s Singapore store.

Singapore’s very own Diptyque boutique is located at Ngee Ann City, and it is the second outlet in Southeast Asia (the first being in Kuala Lumpur). The space is bedecked in brass furnishings and forest green Indian marble while its walls are painted a pleasing hue of bottle green. This is meant to recall Singapore’s status as a garden city as every Diptyque store is designed with the locality in mind.

We may not have bragging rights to being home to the first Diptyque store in Southeast Asia, but its opening in Singapore also marked the 50th anniversary of the brand’s first fragrance, L’Eau — loved for its warm and spicy notes of cinnamon, rose, geranium and cloves.

The gift wrapping station at Diptyque’s Singapore store.

That longevity is in itself, something to celebrate. To mark the occasion, two new scents have been released: Tempo, and Fleur de Peau. Both were developed by perfumer Olivier Pescheux; the former is a concoction that highlights patchouli, with notes of bergamot, violet leaf and pink pepper while the former is a study on the smell of musk with rose, ambergris, pink pepper and iris.

The cherry on top of the icing for all Diptyque aficionados? There’s a gift wrapping service so whether you’re making your purchase for your loved one (or even for yourself), you can bring it home in a pretty little package.

 

Azimin Saini
Editor
Azimin Saini is the deputy editor and manages the team in Singapore and Kuala Lumpur. He writes about food and culture (mostly) and has been told the sound of his backspace is like thunder through the clouds. On a regular day, he has enough caffeine in him to power a small car.